A dash cam isn’t just an optional accessory nowadays. It’s a crucial item that you should definitely have in your car. Whether you use the recording for insurance claims, or to identify potential perpetrators who have committed some kind of crime, choosing the best front and rear dash cam can be important.

Now, why do we say front and rear? Won’t just a front one do it? Well, unfortunately, no. What if you get rear ended? What if someone destroys your rear window? That’s why you get a front and rear one, so you’re covered from all sides.

So, how do you choose one? There are so many options on the market, but not all of them are created equal. We’re talking about both cost, and functionality, so making the right choice can be a bit difficult. We are glad to help, though, and we’ve got a list of the best front and rear dash cam options on the market today. Not just that, but we also have a buyers’ guide that will help you identify key features when shopping. Without wasting any more of your time, let’s first take a look at our options, and see how to pick the right one for you.

The Best Front and Rear Dash Cam (Top 10)

1. Rexing V1P 3rd Gen

Our Pick

An all-round excellent performer that checks all the boxes as far as the basics go, and also comes with quite a bit of advanced features, too. 

We’re kicking things of with a front and rear dash cam by Rexing. It’s the first of a few models from that brand on our list, since they’ve got some truly great options, especially in the budget-friendly space. The V1P 3rd gen is a model that aims to cover all the basics, and then some, and as you’ll see in our buyers guide later on, it does everything it should, really well.

To begin with, both the front and the rear cameras record at 1080p, which is full HD, at 30 frames per second. If you opt for only one of them, you can go up to 2160p, which is 4K, but you’re looking They also have a wide dynamic range which allows them to perform great even when there isn’t too much light. If you want to be able to distinguish details in darker areas, this might be a good option.  Both lenses have a 170 degree field of view, so you can be sure that nothing is left out from the scene.

In terms of additional functionality, the cameras come with a 2.4” LCD screen, which comes in handy if you want to set it up initially to capture the right frame, or review footage. Speaking of review, you can also connect your smartphone via Wi-Fi, and transfer your videos that way.

The cameras are powered by a supercapacitor, an alternative to a battery that’s much more durable when it comes to hot and cold climates. There’s also loop recording, which helps you if you fill up your micro SD card. You can have up to 256GB, though, so that’s not very likely to happen. Last but not least, there’s a G-sensor that locks the current footage in the case of an accident.

Overall, the Rexing V1P 3rd Gen is our top pick for quite a few reasons, and it’s a great contender that still comes in at a reasonable price, especially compared to other options on the market. Yes, it’s close to the priciest one on our list, but it performs better and is much more worth it.

  • 1080P video on both cameras
  • 170 degree field of view
  • Up to 256GB of storage

2. Rexing V1P Pro

Runner Up

At a price slightly higher than our top pick, the V1P Pro is an almost identical variant that also comes with a built-in GPS logger.

Our runner up is also made by Rexing, and it’s their V1P again, but this time in a somewhat older, and a bit more expensive Pro configuration. It’s another close competitor for the title of best front and rear dash cam, as it has most of the functionality of the V1P 3rd gen, but comes at a higher price.

To begin with, the cameras both record at 1080p. If you do want to use only one of them, you can have it record at 2160p, similarly to the V1P 3rd gen. The lenses are both at 170 degrees in terms of field of view, and come with a wide dynamic range that makes things a lot better when you’re trying to distinguish details in darker areas.

There’s no internal memory, but you can have a micro SD card that’s up to 256GB, which does take a lot of footage before it’s full. Loop recording is an option, and there is a G-sensor that will lock any footage in case of a collision. Also inside is a GPS logger that tracks your location and can be pretty handy.

Why is this a runner up, and not our top pick? Well, those who want to buy the best front and rear dash cam usually consider their budget, too, and this one is pricier than the 3rd gen V1P. The only extra thing is the built-in GPS logger, which as you’ll see later on, isn’t really a top priority, so it drops to second in our list.

  • 1080P video on both cameras
  • 170 degree field of view
  • Up to 256GB of storage

 

3. AUKEY DRO2 D 

Also Great

A great contender that isn’t made by Rexing, the DRO2 D has excellent video recording capabilities, as well as advanced features such as loop recording and motion detection.

 

AUKEY is well known in the budget electronics brands market, and there are plenty of products that they make that work admirably, at affordable prices. Their DRO2 D is another such product, a dual dash cam with an excellent set of features, that doesn’t cost too much.

To begin with, you have Sony EXMOR sensors in both cameras that record at full HD, 1080p, and work admirably even in darker conditions. The cameras also have the capability to record in-car audio as well. At the front, there’s a 170 degree field of view, while the one at the back has slightly less, at 152 degrees. However, this is still a complete six-lane view, so you won’t miss out on anything.

The cameras support emergency recording thanks to the built-in G-sensor that captures and locks footage in case of an accident. There’s also loop recording, which overwrites your oldest footage, as well as the ability to connect the cameras to an optional, sold-separately GPS module if you want location and speed data, too. There’s also a motion detector, so you should be protected even if your vehicle is parked.

Since the cameras run on a supercapacitor, they’ll work well even in extreme temperatures, both hot and cold. Inside the box, you’ll find a host of cables, as well as mounts, and all the clips and stickers you need to have them both set up. All things considered, if you think you don’t want to spend too much money on the Rexing options above, the AUKEY DRO2 D is an excellent option for the best front and rear dash cam. Sure, there are even cheaper ones, but they don’t offer the same combination of features and quality.

  • 1080P video on both cameras
  • 170/152 degree field of view (front/rear)
  • Up to 128GB of storage

 

4. VAVA Dual Dash Cam

Also Great

An interesting low profile variant for users who want all the functionality, but don’t want a camera that gets in the way.

The VAVA is the first camera on our list that comes from a brand that isn’t that well known. However, that allows them to pack up a great feature set in a camera that’s still fairly budget friendly, and works admirably in a variety of situations. Both cameras are very small and low profile, so they won’t get in the way when you’re driving, which is excellent.

In terms of video quality, they have Sony EXMOR R sensors, and a field of view of 155 degrees at the front and 140 degrees at the rear. If you want them both to record, you’ll be getting crystal clear 1080p video. If you only use the front one, though, you can have it record at 2560x1440p. All video comes at 30 frames per second, which should be quite sufficient. The sensors, combined with the software, allow you to capture fairly clear video even when there isn’t too much light, which can come in very handy.

You’re also getting the VAVA Dash App, available for both Android and iOS, which you can use in conjunction with the built-in Wi-Fi of the cameras. You can configure the cameras, you can view a live stream, play videos, download, or share them, all from your smartphone. There’s also loop recording, so if you forget to empty your memory card, the latest video is still there. The maximum limit for a micro SD card is 128GB, which should fit quite a bit of footage. And lest we forget, there’s a G-sensor that could help in case of an impact.

Overall, if you think that the other options we mentioned so far are large and get in the way, the VAVA should be the best front and rear dash cam for you.

  • 1080P video on both cameras
  • 155/140 degree field of view (front/rear)
  • Up to 128GB of storage

5. Rexing V1P


We know – another Rexing. It’s the last one though, we promise. And it’s the cheapest one so far, so that’s another thing to justify our choice. If you find the V1P Pro and the V1P 3rd gen too pricey, the regular, first generation V1P might be the right choice for you. It still covers all the basics, but lacks some of the advanced functionality of its more expensive brothers.

For example, with the V1P, the front camera captures 1080p video, but the rear one is limited to a lower, VGA resolution. Even though it’s the front camera that’s critical, it would’ve been nice if the rear camera recorded at least in 720p. The sensor inside is a Sony EXMOR IMX323, which is pretty decent, and the quality from the camera is pretty good. You do get a wide dynamic range, and a 170 degree wide angle lens, which let you capture a large part of the scene, even in sub-optimal light conditions.

Another feature we’re lacking here is Wi-Fi, so you’ll have to resort to traditional methods for transferring your data to a computer. If you do forget to do this, though, there’s loop recording so your latest footage doesn’t get lost. You do get a G-sensor and collision detection, which round out a decent package.

Now, the regular V1P doesn’t measure up to the other options by Rexing we spoke about above. However, at the price it comes at, it’s a lot cheaper than both of them, and sacrificing a few of the features isn’t all that bad. The one big hit is the loss of full HD video at the back, but if you can live with that, and the lack of Wi-Fi, you should be good to go as everything else is there.

     6. Z-EDGE S3 Ultra


    The Z-EDGE S3 Ultra is similar to the VAVA we spoke about earlier in one major way – it isn’t an extremely famous brand, which allows it to give you a camera that’s jam packed with great features, at a price more reasonable than many. This is also the best front and rear dash cam for users who want something that’s compact and low profile, as both cameras stick straight to your windshield and don’t get in the way.

    In terms of video, you get dual 1080p video if both cameras are recording, or 1440p video if you limit yourself to only the front camera. Video is recorded at 30 frames per second, which should be sufficient, and there is a 2.4” LCD display with Picture-in-Picture mode so you can easily look at the footage, or review it afterwards. The field of view is 150 degrees, which is pretty wide, and should help you capture the entire scene. The wide dynamic range ensures that the S3 Ultra is just as usable at night as it is during the day, so you don’t have to worry about that.

    There’s one thing that we didn’t see with any of the other options here, and it’s the automatic recording on vehicle ignition. This is important since it removes the “oops, I forgot” scenario in case of an accident. There’s also things such as loop recording, a G-sensor, a parking mode, as well as a one-button audio recording switch.

    All things considering, the S3 Ultra is a very attractive package, especially at its asking price. You get great video quality and all the important features, as well as an automatic recording on vehicle ignition, which is very helpful if you need it. Plus, you’re getting a 16GB memory card inside the box, which you can upgrade up to 128GB. An all-round great option.

      7. Crosstour CR900


      Moving on to even more budget-friendly variants, we’ve got Crosstour’s CR900. While other competitors at this price range usually only offer 720p video, the CR900 dual front and rear dash cam gives you 1080p quality both at the front, and the rear.

      The 6-glass lens and advanced sensor work great, and you’ll be getting excellent image quality. Also, both cameras have an f/1.8 aperture and high dynamic range. This means that even during the night, you’ll be able to distinguish important details such as license plates and faces. You will also appreciate the 170 degree field of view, which is just as wide as cameras that cost a lot more, and helps you capture the entire road ahead of you, as well as a good chunk of your surroundings. The cameras are powered by a Novatek chip, which ensures consistently good performance in various working conditions.

      In terms of additional features, there’s an optional GPS functionality but it does require an antenna. At this price, though, it’s to be expected. It does come with a G-sensor, so you can rest assured that video is captured in case of an accident. The 3” LCD is pretty good, and allows you to review all the footage you’ve captured before you transfer it to your computer.

      A place where the CR900 is significantly lacking is in the memory department. It doesn’t come with built-in memory, and the maximum capacity that’s supported is 32GB. Since there’s no mention of loop recording, we would advise that you check whether you have room a bit more often. You don’t want to lose your video when you need it most. If, however, this is something you can live with, the CR900 is a good budget option.

        8. APEMAN Dual Dash Cam


        If you don’t mind having a slightly bigger dash cam, the APEMAN front and rear dash cam might be a great option. It’s priced significantly below our top pick (and the runner up, for that matter), yet manages to offer most of the essential functionality, and then some. The only downside, as we mentioned, is the front unit’s size, but if you can live with that, by all means read on.

        For starters, the video quality is 1080p when you’re using both cameras, or 1440p if you don’t plug in the rear one. With a 150 degree field of view, the camera captures a large part of the scene, and should be more than enough. There’s plenty of details in the recordings, even in situations where you don’t have that much light at your disposal. The G-sensor will lock any videos that are captured in case of an accident, and if you forgot to turn it on, it’ll start recording automatically.

        A great thing here is that even though you don’t get an included memory card (something we can’t complain about given the price), you can get one that’s as large as 128GB. This should fit quite a lot of footage, but there’s loop recording as well. If you forget to empty it, you don’t have to worry. Reviewing the footage is done on a 2.7” LCD screen, and you have four side buttons for easy operation.

        Now, there’s no advanced features here such as GPS, automatic on with car ignition etc. However, the APEMAN gives you all the basics, and some of the more necessary extras, at a price that’s more than affordable for many. If you don’t need all the extra features of the higher end models, this could very well be the best front and rear dash cam for you.

          9. Peztio Dual Dash Cam


          And so, we arrive at the last two options, which are identically priced, and at a quarter of the price of our most expensive model on the list. The first one is the Peztio, and we can comfortably say that it doesn’t come with only a quarter of the features of said most expensive model, but a lot more. The fact that Peztio don’t spend too much on advertising allow them to sell it at an affordable price, and it’s a great dual dash cam for budget-conscious users. It’s not without its compromises, though, so read on.

          For starters, the front camera records at 1080p, which is great, but the rear unit has a lower resolution, which is the first place where corners were cut. The front field of view is 170 degrees, but as expected, it’s lower at 130 degrees at the back. If you don’t mind this, though, the video quality is great both during the day, and during the night, thanks to the f/1.8 aperture and wide dynamic range.

          In terms of additional features, you’re getting a 3” IPS display which lets you review footage, and helps quite a bit when you’re setting up the camera. There is also a G-sensor that locks footage in case of an accident, as well as loop recording and motion detection. Unfortunately, the largest capacity memory card that’s supported is only 32GB. However, at the lower resolution of the rear camera, this should still fit in a decent amount of video, and there’s always loop recording to help out.

          At the end of the day, if you find yourself really, really limited with your budget, but want the peace of mind of a dash cam, the Peztio Dual Dash Cam is a good choice.

            10. NINE CUBE Dual Dash Cam 


            The last option on our list of best front and rear dash cam models is another budget-friendly option, the NINE CUBE Dual Dash Cam. It comes with more or less the same feature set as the Peztio, but is a bit more obtrusive when you mount it, which is why it got the lower position on the list.

            Aside from that, you have a front camera that records at 1080p, and a rear one that records at 720p. This is still decent, and you should get a good quality video regardless of whether you’re looking at the front or the rear feed. The front one also has a 170 degree field of view, while the rear one is a bit tighter, at 120 degrees. Unfortunately, the NINE CUBE doesn’t perform that well at night, which is one of its largest downsides.

            On the upside, you’re getting a 4” IPS screen (which is why the front unit is so large), which lets you easily review footage if necessary. There’s also a built-in G-sensor that locks videos instantly in case of a collision. Loop recording is also here, as well as motion detection and a parking monitor. You not only get the basics, but a few extras, too.

            Another downside, though, is the 32GB limit for micro SD cards, which means you’ll need to transfer your files a bit more often than you’d like. However, if you can live with that, the NINE CUBE is a pretty attractive option at its asking price, and one we would certainly recommend for budget-oriented users.

               

              Purchasing Guide

              You’ll find a host of features and specs when you’re looking at dash cams, but which ones matter more, and which ones less, is a bit tricky to decide when you’re shopping for the first time. Let’s take a look at the most important specs first, and then everything else.

              Things to look for:

              1. Video resolution
              2. Storage capacity
              3. Night vision
              4. Automatic on/off
              5. Loop recording
              6. Camera size
              7. GPS
              8. Impact sensor

              Video resolution

              This is undoubtedly the key aspect of a front and rear dash cam. The resolution directly impacts the quality, as a higher resolution lets you distinguish more details, more easily. When you’re trying to see the other car’s license plate, it’ll be much easier with a higher resolution camera.

              When shopping for a modern camera, 720p HD is the least you’ll want. This should be sufficient for not just license plates, but car makes and models too, as well as faces. If your budget allows it, by all means go for 1080p Full HD, or even 4K. Note, however, that 4K cams may sacrifice features in order to give you a higher resolution at a lower price, so that may require a compromise.

              Storage capacity

              Most dash cams allow you to add a micro SD card, but some come with built-in memory, too. The minimum we would recommend is 32GB, but more is always better. Storage becomes more of an issue when you’re working with higher resolution files. For example, an hour of 720p footage may be around 1 or 2GB, depending on the bit rate. If you record an hour of 1080p footage, though, chances are you’re looking at more than 6GB. Choose the storage capacity according to the resolution, but if you can, always get more storage.

              Night vision

              The last of the crucial features is night vision. You never know when an accident might happen, and people who want to damage your car will most likely do that during the night. In many situations, street lights, city lights, and even headlights will give you a decent amount of light, but those lights aren’t always there, are they?

              A front and rear dash cam that has night vision will be able to give you a clear and bright image even in the darkest of scenarios, so you can easily distinguish details in the dark.

              Automatic on/off

              Even though not exactly crucial, automatic on and off is still a fairly important aspect of a dash cam. We’re talking about a camera that connects to your vehicle (or has a motion sensor), and starts recording as soon as you start the car, or you start moving.

              This is highly important because a dash cam is only useful when it’s recording. And if Murphy’s Law is anything to go by, that one time you forget to turn it on yourself is the day you have an accident. This isn’t something you should be risking, and the peace of mind is very well worth it.

              Loop recording

              Even if you got a lower resolution camera with plenty of storage, and added a large micro SD card, chances are you’ll have it fill up at some point. With loop recording, the new footage will overwrite the oldest footage you have on your camera, thus ensuring that you always have the last few hours of driving recorded. This can be crucial, and losing out on some of your older footage is well worth it in such a scenario.

              Camera size

              When you’re driving, you want to focus and you don’t want obstructions. Therefore, a large dash cam on your windshield can easily get in the way, and is something you want to avoid. For the front device, you should have a smaller camera that doesn’t block line of sight. The rear one is less critical, but a smaller camera is more useful here, too.

              GPS

              A GPS sensor can show exactly where you’ve been in case something happens, as well as be your friend in case of a wrongful speeding ticket. And if you’re a parent, you can always check if your children went where they said they will. A useful, but not extremely crucial feature.

              Impact sensor

              Last but not least, an impact sensor can detect when there’s been an accident, and save the footage from a few minutes earlier. Or, it can start recording at that same instant, which is useful if you’ve had your car parked. Another feature that isn’t crucial, but is high on the list of nice-to-haves.

              Closing words

              By now you should know most of the things there are to know about choosing the best front and rear dash cam. We’ve discussed your options, and we’ve talked about how to choose the best feature set for you. All that’s left is for you to go through the list one more time and choose which one fits your needs best! Or look below, and get the Rexing V1P 3rd Gen – our top pick.

              1. Rexing V1P 3rd Gen

              Our Pick again

              An all-round excellent performer that checks all the boxes as far as the basics go, and also comes with quite a bit of advanced features, too.